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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Thomas Massie
U.S. Representative R-Kentucky
LINKTV 07/24/2013
Massie: If we accept the premise it is ok for government to lie to us or for one branch of the government to lie to another branch of government in order to protect our public safety, then we have crossed the threshold. We cannot accept it is ok for government to lie to us to protect us. Conyers: yes
C-SPAN Announcer
0
CSPAN2 07/26/2013
CSPAN announcer: In other administration news today the attorney general Eric holder told the Russian government the US will not seek the death penalty for the former national security agency systems analyst Edward Snowden. Reports say Mr.. Snowden has filed papers seeking temporary asylum in Russia on grounds that if he were to return to the US he would be tortured and would face the death penalty.
George Stephanopoulos
ABC host, This Week With George Stephanopoulos
KGO 07/28/2013
Stephanopoulos: Your new reporting zeroes in on one of the most explosive claims made by Snowden a few weeks back. Let's take a look. Video of Snowden: and I sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge, to everyone the president if I had a personal e-mail. Now that claim was denied by intelligence officials, and the Chair of the House Intelligence Committee, Mike Rogers said he was lying. But your new reporting bolsters Snowden's claim.
Peter King
U.S. Senator, R-New York, Homeland Security Committee
CNNW 07/28/2013
King: There was absolutely no spying going on. This has been held by the courts through total compliance with the fourth amendment. And that type of irrational rhetoric gets us nowhere. The fact is this works. It protects us, and it's not violating the rights of one. Not one American's right has been violated. It's irresponsible to be coming out with those ridiculous statements. Crowley: I'll let you respond to irrational, and then we'll go to cornell. Chris Plant: listen, when we're scanning every piece of mail that goes through the post office, we're keeping the phone logs on every phone call made, we're collecting e-mails, collecting
Peter King
U.S. Senator, R-New York, Homeland Security Committee
CNNW 07/28/2013
Chris Plant: Google searches. We've got -- King: we are not collecting e-mails. Chris Plant: what we are -- King: we're not collecting e-mails. Chris Plant: we are.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CNNW 07/28/2013
Feinstein: Here's what this man did. By his own admission, he came to Booz Allen to be a contractor -- Crowley: you meant Snowden? Feinstein: I meant Snowden. With the purpose of going in there and taking as much material as he possibly could. He took much more than I could possibly think he could. It's very sensitive data. And then he went and strategically placed it so that it could come out at different times. Then he went
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CNNW 07/28/2013
Feinstein continued: to two big-cyber intruding powers, China and Russia, and left china and went to Russia. You've got to ask why did he choose those two? You've got to also ask, do the Chinese have all this material? Do the Russians have it? Crowley: do we know? Feinstein: we don't know. Crowley: oh, okay. Feinstein: so it's a very serious situation.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/28/2013
I think the idea that security and liberty are mutually exclusive is just wrong. I think it is possible, with sensible public policy, to have both.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/28/2013
In a number of these areas, what we want to make sure that when it relates to national security, and for example that means keeping intelligence operations secret, we're going to do that every step of the way. But that is different than keeping the law secret. We are going to spell out there is a difference between secret operations, which have to be protected to address those issues that Governor Chris Christie was talking about, and secret law, which is not what our system of government is all about.
Ron Wyden
U.S. Senator (D-Oregon), Member of Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN 07/28/2013
The idea of vacuuming up these phone records, who we called, when we called, where we called from, in effect laying bare our personal lives to the scrutiny of government bureaucrats and contractors, is not with the country is about. What we want them focused on is people who are suspected of terrorism and the terrorists they deal with.
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